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Is It Illegal To Take Goliath Grouper Out Of The Water

author
Maria Garcia
• Tuesday, 01 December, 2020
• 7 min read

Maggie Marmoreal/For the Herald The goliathgrouper, the monster reef fish that can grow to 800 pounds and nearly disappeared in the 1970s, is off-limits for now. On Thursday, Florida wildlife commissioners refused to lift a nearly two-decade ban on harvesting the fish, citing continued uncertainty about the remaining numbers and bowing to the demands of divers and scientists, who packed a meeting and led an online petition that drew nearly 60,000 signatures.

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(Source: www.flickr.com)

Contents

“The fact we’re even having this discussion means we’ve been successful,” said Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission chair BO River. Curious and generally fearless, they were easy targets for anglers and spear fishermen, especially when they gathered in large numbers in July and August to mate.

After the ban in 1990, the fish began to bounce back, but scientists believe Florida's record 2010 freeze likely sent numbers downward again. Anglers, however, have increasingly complained that the voracious fish are taking over reefs and gobbling up their catches.

A survey FCC conducted in the Keys and Dry Tortugas found just a 2 and 4.5 percent increase. They also said lobster counts have remained stable, indicating that the fish are not affecting the popular, and lucrative, crustacean.

The controversy over whether to allow harvesting has divided some anglers and divers, who consider the gentle Goliath a mascot for the reefs. On Thursday, about 60 speakers, nearly all divers and many wearing Save the Goliath T-shirts handed out by the Diving Equipment & Marketing Association, criticized the move as an attempt to appease anglers.

“You’re awarding a trophy fish to essentially a lazy hunter,” said Miami diver James Woodard. UM Rosenthal School of Marine and Atmospheric Science fishery scientist Bill Hartford and Nova geneticist Andrea Bernard said they are working on building a statistical model, similar to methods used to assess blue fin tuna, that can account for gaps in catch history caused by the fishing moratorium and provide an accurate count for adult fish in Florida.

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(Source: captlarrymcguire.blogspot.com)

“People got us into this problem and if the fishing opens back up, we'll likely be back in this position,” said Ellie Fodder, a sophomore environmental study major at Becker College who left campus at 3:30 a.m. Thursday with her dive club, the Scuba Jews, and campus rabbi, Ed Rosenthal, to make the morning meeting. The giant of the grouper family, the Goliath (formerly called Jewish) has brown or yellow mottling with small black spots on the head and fins, a large mouth with jawbones that extend well past its small eyes, and a rounded tail.

The skeletal structure of large Goliath grouper cannot adequately support their weight out of the water without some type of damage. If a large Goliath is brought on-board a vessel or out of the water, it is likely to sustain some form of internal injury and therefore be considered harvested.

Goliath grouper populations declined throughout their range during the 1970s and 1980s due to increased fishing pressure from commercial and recreational fishers and divers. At their July 2014 meeting in Key Largo, this committee reviewed the most up-to-date scientific information on goliathgrouper and recommended a new stock assessment for this species.

As a result, the most recent stock assessment, conducted by the FCC was completed in June 2016 (Sedan 47). The stock assessment indicates abundance in south Florida has greatly increased since the fishery closed in 1990.

However, in the final step of the review process, the assessment was rejected by an independent panel of scientists for use in federal management due to a lack of reliable indicators of abundance outside south Florida. Goliath are also susceptible to large scale mortality events such as cold temperatures and red tide blooms.

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(Source: fishingbooker.com)

When not feeding or spawning, adult Goliath groupers are generally solitary, sedentary and territorial. Before the goliathgrouper reaches full-size it is preyed upon by barracuda, king mackerel and moray eels, as well as sandbar and hammerhead sharks.

Calico crabs make up the majority of their diet, with other invertebrate species and fish filling in the rest. Reproductive maturity first occurs in fish 5 or 6 years of age (about 36 inches in length) due to their slow growth rate.

Males mature at a smaller size (about 42 inches) and slightly younger age than females. These groups occur at consistent sites such as wrecks, rock ledges and isolated patch reefs during July, August and September.

Studies have shown fish may move up to 62 miles (100 km) from inshore reefs to these spawning sites. In southwest Florida, presumed courtship behavior has been observed during the full moons in August and September.

Found nearshore around docks, in deep holes, and on ledges; young often occur in estuaries, especially around oyster bars; more abundant in southern Florida than in northern waters. Spawns over summer months; lifespan of 30 to 50 years; feeds on crustaceans and fish.

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(Source: thegreatwhitehunter.wordpress.com)

CLOSED TO HARVEST OR POSSESSION IN THE SOUTH ATLANTIC EEA (FEDERAL WATERS) SINCE 1990. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has provided additional guidelines on release techniques for Goliath grouper.

Note: Goliath grouper and Nassau grouper must be released by cutting the line and NOT removed from the water. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has provided additional guidelines on release techniques for Goliath grouper.

At least one hooking device is required and must be used as needed to remove hooks embedded in South Atlantic snapper- grouper with minimum damage. Descending Device Requirement: Requirement: A descending device is required to be on board and readily available for use on all vessels fishing for or possessing snapper- grouper species; Definition of a Descending Device: an instrument to which is attached a minimum of a 16 ounce weight and a length of line that will release the fish at the depth from which the fish was caught or a minimum of 60 feet.

Since minimizing surface time is critical to increasing survival, descending devices shall be readily available for use while engaged in fishing. At least one hooking device is required and must be used as needed to remove hooks embedded in South Atlantic snapper- grouper with minimum damage.

Descending Device Requirement: Requirement: A descending device is required to be on board and readily available for use on all vessels fishing for or possessing snapper- grouper species; Definition of a Descending Device: an instrument to which is attached a minimum of a 16 ounce weight and a length of line that will release the fish at the depth from which the fish was caught or a minimum of 60 feet. Since minimizing surface time is critical to increasing survival, descending devices shall be readily available for use while engaged in fishing.

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(Source: fishingchartersanibelfl.com)

Click here for helpful resources, including: best fishing practices tips information on hook types how-to videos On August 26th, Joshua Anyzeski caught the prohibited species, removing it from the water to take a picture.

The picture circulated on social media, which tipped off officers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. A Key West college student learned a hard lesson about Florida wildlife law this week, police said.

Joshua David Anyzeski, 18, was jailed Monday after state fish and wildlife officers said he removed a Goliath grouper from the water, so he could pose for a photo with it. He was arrested on a misdemeanor charge of possession of a Goliath grouper, booked into the Stock Island Detention Center and released the same day after posting a $7,500 bond.

A Key West college student got arrested after sharing this photo with friends in a group text. “The lagoon is a classroom space where we teach diving and marine science classes,” said Amber Ernst-Leonard, the college’s spokeswoman.

Anyzeski got in trouble after sending the photo of him holding the Goliath grouper to friends in a group text to brag about snagging the fish, according to the report. On Aug. 28, FCC investigators went to Anyzeski’s dorm room at the College of the Florida Keys to speak with him about the photo.

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(Source: www.tripadvisor.com)

Asked if Anyzeski is in trouble with the school for the catch, Ernst-Leonard said the college does not comment on student disciplinary cases. She was part of the staff at the New Orleans Times-Picayune that in 2005 won two Pulitzer Prizes for coverage of Hurricane Katrina.

Hey guys just wanted to know if the legs still state that you can't remove a Goliath grouper fully out of the water. A friend of mine just posted some fishing photos of her and her boyfriend, and I was surprised to see a large sized Goliath grouper lip gaffed and brought on board to take pics with several people, individually (some with blood coming out of the mouth or gills).

Im pretty sure TX has the same law as they're protected federally Florida's laws do not allow the fish to be removed from the water.

But at the same time if you catch any reef fish (which a Goliath is) you have to vent them before returning them to the water. Florida Sportsman's magazine will no longer publish pictures of fish like Goliath or tarpon that are removed from the water.

So far it's just been verbal warnings but I expect soon they will start writing tickets for illegal possession. You are not required to use the vent tool or the Hooker every time, but you must have both items on the vessel.

florida late fishing august
(Source: forums.floridasportsman.com)

There is a guideline about when to use the venting tool: FCC's website says, “Removing smaller Goliath groupers from the water to remove hooks is not necessarily a bad practice, but this process must be done with care...” So, presumably it's okay to boat a small Goliath for the purpose of venting it. But I told her it was illegal, and she said the captain didn't say anything about bringing the beast on board.

The coasts of Florida have been a fisherman's hub for record-breaking catches this year, but a Cape Coral man may have set a new feat after snagging a giant fish while on a paddleboard. Chance is flung off the paddleboard at one point during the video, but he was able to recover and reel in the 412-pound fish, guiding it to a nearby boat.

We were in the Keys a couple of years ago and were also told it was illegal to even bring one out of the water because they ARE a protected species. Sign in it really depends on where you live... I am guessing Florida, so check myfwc.com, but you first have to catch one.

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Sources
1 heavy.com - https://heavy.com/news/2018/07/goliath-grouper-eats-shark-video/
2 www.wptv.com - https://www.wptv.com/news/protecting-paradise/video-hammerhead-shark-attacks-goliath-grouper-off-singer-island
3 www.express.co.uk - https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/1241075/shark-news-latest-great-white-hammerhead-attack-singer-island-florida-USA
4 www.travelerstoday.com - https://www.travelerstoday.com/articles/11480/20140822/goliath-grouper-attacks-4-foot-black-tip-shark-groupers-considered.htm
5 elexonic.com - https://elexonic.com/2019/07/14/feeding-frenzy-of-11-sharks-ends-in-surprising-twist-and-a-mouthful-of-shark-for-1-grouper/
6 www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu - https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/museum-voices/webology/tag/sharks/