logo
Archive

Grouper Interactive Tool Pdpm

author
Paul Gonzalez
• Friday, 30 October, 2020
• 31 min read

In July 2018, CMS finalized a new case-mix classification model, the Patient Driven Payment Model (PDP), that, effective beginning October 1, 2019, will be used under the Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) Prospective Payment System (PPS) for classifying SNF patients in a covered Part A stay. This site includes a variety of educational and training resources to assist stakeholders in preparing for PDP implementation.

(Source: www.youtube.com)

Contents

In May 2017, CMS released an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rule making (AN PRM) which outlined a new case-mix model, the Resident Classification System, Version I (RCS-I), that would be used to replace the existing RUG-IV case-mix model, used to classify residents in a covered Part A stay into payment groups under the SNF PPS. Since the AN PRM, we continued our stakeholder engagement efforts to address the concerns and questions raised by commenters with RCS-I.

Below are several items we have posted concurrent with the FY 2019 SNF PPS Norm to assist stakeholders in reviewing and commenting on the proposed PDP. For a subset of these ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes, the clinical category will be modified if there were specific related surgical procedures performed in the hospital stay immediately preceding admission to the skilled nursing facility.

The surgical procedure code lists provided will be used as a reference by the skilled nursing facility staff to augment the resident’s clinical category classification. The staff would review the information sent by the preceding hospital stay to identify any procedures defined in these surgical clinical categories.

To assist stakeholders in understanding the process by which SNF residents would be classified into PDP payment groups, we are providing three files. The first file provides a narrative step-by-step walkthrough that would allow stakeholders to manually determine a resident’s PDP classification based on the data from an MDS assessment.

In the second phase of the project, which is now in process, the contractor is using the findings from this Base Year Final Summary Report as a guide to identify potential models suitable for further analysis. Acumen hosted a third Technical Expert Panel in June 2016 to provide an outline of basic payment structure for a revised SNF PPS, including the various new components of the revised SNF PPS and a discussion of potential pricing schedules which may be incorporated.

grouper basics isc upenn resources
(Source: www.isc.upenn.edu)

Acumen hosted a fourth Technical Expert Panel in October 2016 to provide an outline of the recommended alternative payment model for a revised SNF PPS, including the various new components of the revised SNF PPS and a discussion of potential pricing schedules which may be incorporated. Based on the work conducted by Acumen during the second phase of the project, which included substantial feedback from stakeholders and four Technical Expert Panels, the contractor drafted a Technical Report (PDF), which discusses the research conducted by the contractor on developing an alternative to the existing methodology used to pay for services under the SNF PPS.

To assist stakeholders in their review of the RCS-I model, as discussed in the SNF PPS Advance Notice of Proposed Rule making (AN PRM) and Technical Report provided above, we are providing a provider-specific impact analysis file, which details the estimated impact of the RCS-I model discussed in the AN PRM on Medicare Part A payments to each SNF in the country. This file provides a step-by-step walk-through that allows stakeholders to manually determine a resident’s RCS-I classification based on the data from an MDS assessment.

This document should be used in conjunction with the discussions found in the AN PRM and accompanying Technical Report to better understand the process for resident classification under RCS-I. The contractor is continuing with further refinements and considering potential improvements to the overall SNF PPS payment structure, and we welcome your comments and feedback.

Both U07.1, COVID-19 and U07.0, Vaping-related disorder are assigned to the Medication Management, Teaching and Assessment-Respiratory (MMTA-Respiratory) clinical group for purposes of case-mix adjustment under the HH PPS. The PDG relies more heavily on clinical characteristics, and other patient information to place home health periods of care into meaningful payment categories.

One case-mix variable is the assignment of the principal diagnosis to one of 12 clinical groups to explain the primary reason for home health services. CMS is aware of issues with the latest PDP DLL Package (V1.0002 FINAL).

grouper integration demo internet2 sis persons importing resource
(Source: spaces.at.internet2.edu)

We are targeting to release an updated version on Monday, October 7, 2019, which corrects the identified grouper discrepancies. Late submission payment penalties do not apply under the SNF PPS.

Taking the following steps can help nurse assessment coordinators (ACS) capture the optimal TNA comorbidity score: This video tutorial is approximately 22 minutes in length and is designed to provide targeted guidance for accurate coding using live-action patient/resident scenarios.

Read more An update to the PDP Grouper DLL has been posted, along with its source code and test cases. This version, V1.0008, corrects an issue with a dynamic array that was not consistently reinitialized when processing multiple assessments within a short time frame.

It is important to include the control item STATE_ PDP _OBRA_CD (as defined in the V3.00.5 errata for the FINAL version (v3.00.1) of the MDS 3.0 Data Specifications) for assessments with target date on or after October 1, 2020. Note that this FINAL version supports the ICD-10 codes that are defined in the data specifications as valid for item I0020B for FY2021.

Also, please note that the grouper expects valid FY2021 ICD-10 codes for I8000A-J when processing assessments with target date on or after October 1, 2020. Read more Navigating the COVID-19 public health emergency can be difficult for skilled nursing facilities (SNES).

grouper integration demo internet2 created imported assignments membership according
(Source: spaces.at.internet2.edu)

Read more Key information about how to submit MDS files and how to obtain and understand error messages on initial and final validation reports. While most of the information used to establish these codes is already on the Bra assessments, the additional data collection will require both time to complete and training performing correctly.

Notably, the addition of completing the admission performance column for section GG (Functional Abilities) will take the most time. However, the stress and workload can be mitigated with a strong preparation plan and ongoing support to direct care staff.

Follow these four steps to ensure your team is ready to complete successfully the documentation and data collection for section GG on Bra assessments: CMS is publishing this final rule consistent with the legal requirements to update Medicare payment policies for SNF son an annual basis.

In recognition of the significant impact of the COVID-19 public health emergency, and limited capacity of health care providers to review and provide comment on extensive proposals, CMS has limited annual SNF rule making required by statute to essential policies including Medicare payment to SNES. In response to stakeholder feedback, we are also finalizing changes to the International Classification of Diseases, Version 10 (ICD-10) code mappings, effective October 1, 2020.

Finally, this rule includes minor administrative changes related to the SNF Value-Based Purchasing (VIP) Program. Visit this page frequently to get new information to help you lead your team and ensure that your facility thrives under PDP.

(Source: www.youtube.com)

Fiscal Year 2021 Proposed Medicare Payment and Policy Changes for Skilled Nursing Facilities (CMS-1737-P) CMS is publishing this proposed rule consistent with the legal requirements to update Medicare payment policies for skilled nursing facilities on an annual basis.

CMS recognizes that the entire healthcare system is focused on responding to the COVID-19 public health emergency. These updates include routine technical rate-setting updates to the SNF PPS payment rates, as well as a proposal to adopt the most recent Office of Management and Budget (OMB) statistical area delineations and apply a 5 percent cap on wage index decreases from FY 2020 to FY 2021.

Finally, this rule includes minor administrative proposals related to the SNF Value-Based Purchasing (VIP) Program, further described below. The health and safety of America’s patients and provider workforce in the face of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak is the top priority of the Trump Administration and CMS.

We are working around the clock to equip the American healthcare system with maximum flexibility to respond to the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Recently, at President Trump’s direction, CMS issued an unprecedented array of temporary regulatory waivers and new rules to equip the American healthcare system with maximum flexibility to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, including waiving the SNF benefit’s 3-day qualifying inpatient hospital stay requirement (pursuant to section 1812(f) of the Social Security Act), which allows SNF patients to be admitted without the typically required 3-day inpatient hospital stay and additional flexibility in relation to how beneficiaries may access a new SNF benefit period without the typical 60-day “wellness” period.

This proposed rule includes proposals that would continue a commitment to shift Medicare payments from volume to value, with the continued implementation of the Patient Driven Payment Model (PDP) and the SNF VIP, to improve program interoperability, operational quality and safety. This methodology uses prospective, case-mix adjusted per diem payment rates applicable to all covered SNF services defined in section 1888(e)(2)(A) of the Social Security Act.

grouper internet2 alum selecting affiliation ref
(Source: spaces.at.internet2.edu)

Under section 1888(e)(4)(G)(ii) of the Act, we adjust the federal rates to account for differences in area wage levels. We proposed to adopt revised geographic delineations provided by the Office of Management and Budget, which are used to identify a provider’s status as an urban or rural facility and to calculate the wage index and apply a 5 percent cap to wage index decreases.

Implemented on October 1, 2019, PDP utilizes International Classification of Diseases, Version 10 (ICD-10) codes to classify SNF patients into payment groups. The Program aims to improve quality of care by incentivizing SNES to reduce unplanned hospital readmissions.

In the FY 2021 SNF PPS proposed rule, CMS is proposing to align the SNF VIP Program regulation text at 42 CFR § 413.338 with previously finalized policies, to apply the 30-day Phase One Review and Correction deadline to the baseline period quality measure quarterly report, and to establish performance periods and performance standards for upcoming program years. This final rule includes policies that continue to move forward agency commitments to shift Medicare payments from volume to value, with the continued implementation of the SNF VIP and SNF ARP to improve program interoperability, operational quality and safety.

Read more Many directors of nursing services (DNS) have a hands-off approach when it comes to fee-for-service Medicare Part A and the MDS process, says Suzy Harvey, RN-BC, RAC-CT, managing consultant at BKD in Springfield, MO. That approach works for the RUG-IV case-mix classification system, but when the Skilled Nursing Facility Prospective Payment System (SNF PPS) switches to the Patient-Driven Payment Model (PDP) on Oct. 1, rehabilitation therapy will no longer drive Part A skilled care, says Harvey.

Read more When the Patient-Driven Payment Model (PDP) replaces RUG-IV as the case-mix classification system for the Skilled Nursing Facility Prospective Payment System (SNF PPS) effective Oct. 1, 2019, some SNES may see their Part A length of stay temporarily increase, says Maureen McCarthy, BS, RN, RAC-MT, CPM, DNS-MT, RAC-CTA, president/CEO of Celtic Consulting in Torrington, CT. Read more The fundamental reason that the new Patient-Driven Payment Model (PDP) will replace RUG-IV as the case-mix classification system for traditional Medicare Part A residents under the Skilled Nursing Facility Prospective Payment System (SNF PPS) on Oct. 1, 2019, is that “therapy payments under the SNF PPS are based almost entirely on merely the amount of therapy the patient receives,” said officials with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) during the Dec. 11 SNF PPS: PDP National Provider Call.

(Source: www.youtube.com)

Read more Medicare Program: Prospective Payment System and Consolidated Billing for Skilled Nursing Facilities Final Rule for FY 2019, SNF Value-Based Purchasing Program, and SNF Quality Reporting Program This final rule updates the payment rates used under the prospective payment system (PPS) for skilled nursing facilities (SNES) for fiscal year (FY) 2019. Correction Notice SUMMARY: This document corrects technical errors in the final rule that appeared in the August 8, 2018, Federal Register (83 FR 39162) entitled “Medicare Program; Prospective Payment System and Consolidated Billing for Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNF) Final Rule for FY 2019, SNF Value-Based Purchasing Program, and SNF Quality Reporting Program.” DATES: The corrections in this document are effective October 1, 2018.

Read more Skilled nursing facilities should save approximately $2 billion in aggregate reduced administrative costs over the next 10 years ($12,000 and 183 hours in savings per provider annually), said officials with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in a review of key aspects of the Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 SNF PPS Proposed Rule during the May 1 Skilled Nursing Facility/Long-term Care Open Door Forum. “While the current system requires substantial paperwork to track the volume of service utilization over time, PDP eliminates the need of these frequent patient assessments and allows clinicians to focus more time on treating the patient,” noted officials.

Note: PDP is based on the Resident Classification System, Version I, or RCS-I, that CMS presented last year. With the latest updates to the State Operations Manual, it is more important than ever to promote resident safety and well-being through infection prevention and control.

Read more Respiratory Protection Guidance for the Employers of Those Working in Nursing Homes, Assisted Living, and Other Long-Term Care Facilities During the COVID-19 Pandemic These nursing homes are being recognized for demonstrating significant reductions in COVID-19 related infections and deaths between August and September.

“These $333 million in performance payments are going to nursing homes that have maintained safer environments for residents between August and September,” said HHS Secretary Alex Agar. In response, the Trump Administration has employed a number of strategies to protect nursing home residents and slow the spread of COVID-19.

administrator grouper columbia remove
(Source: cuit.columbia.edu)

Of this amount, HHS distributed $2.5 billion in early September to help nursing homes with upfront COVID-19-related expenses for testing, staffing, and personal protective equipment (PPE) needs. This performance-based payment structure will reward nursing homes for keeping new COVID-19 infection and mortality rates among residents lower than the communities they serve, as analyzed against CDC data.

Today, HHS is announcing that in the first round of the incentive program, which compared data from August to September, 10,631 nursing homes, or over 77 percent of the 13,795 eligible, met the infection control criteria. HHS is encouraged by the promising September results but recognize this virus is dynamic and there is still opportunity for continued improvement.

Safeguarding nursing home residents from the perils of this devastating pandemic will remain a top priority for HHS. HCP should recognize potential exposures unrelated to patient care and use prevention measures, including masks.

Improved access to personal protective equipment, flexible medical leave, and testing is needed. Read more The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is taking steps to ensure all Americans, including the nation’s seniors, have access to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine at no cost when it becomes available.

Today, the agency released a comprehensive plan with proactive measures to remove regulatory barriers and ensure consistent coverage and payment for the administration of an eventual vaccine for millions of Americans. CMS released a set of toolkits for providers, states and insurers to help the health care system prepare to swiftly administer the vaccine once it is available.

(Source: www.youtube.com)

In addition, CMS is taking action to increase reimbursement for any new COVID-19 treatments that are approved or authorized by the FDA. “We have developed a comprehensive plan to support the swift and successful distribution of a safe and effective vaccine for COVID-19,” said CMS Administrator Seems Versa.

“As Operation Warp Speed nears its goal of delivering the vaccine in record time, CMS is acting now to remove bureaucratic barriers while ensuring that states, providers and health plans have the information and direction they need to ensure broad vaccine access and coverage for all Americans.” To ensure broad access to a vaccine for America’s seniors, CMS released an Interim Final Rule with Comment Period (IFC) today that establishes that any vaccine that receives Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorization, either through an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) or licensed under a Biologic License Application (BLA), will be covered under Medicare as a preventive vaccine at no cost to beneficiaries.

Under current rules, hospitals may qualify for additional “outlier payments,” but only when their costs for a particular patient exceed a certain threshold. Under this IFC, hospitals would qualify for additional payments when they treat patients with innovative new products approved or authorized to treat COVID-19 to mitigate any losses they may experience from making these therapies available, even if they do not reach the current outlier threshold.

The IFC also makes changes to reimbursement for outpatient hospital services to ensure payment for certain innovative treatments for COVID-19 that occur outside bundled arrangements and are paid separately. In addition, CMS released information to prepare hospitals to bill for the outpatient administration of a monoclonal antibody product in the event one is approved under an emergency use authorization (EUA).

CMS is also taking continued steps to ensure that price transparency extends to COVID-19 testing during the PHE. Provisions in the IFC require that any provider who performs a COVID-19 diagnostic test post their cash prices online.

mic coordination dlr monitoring instrument example
(Source: www.pilotest.com)

Provides an extension of Performance Year 5 for the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (Car) model; and Creates flexibility in the public notice requirements and post-award public participation requirements for a State Innovation Waiver under Section 1332 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act during the COVID-19 PHE. Along with these regulatory changes, CMS is issuing three toolkits aimed at state Medicaid agencies, providers who will administer the vaccine, and health insurance plans.

Together, these toolkits will help ensure the health care system is prepared to successfully administer a safe and effective vaccine by addressing issues related to access, billing and payment, and coverage. CMS is working to increase the number of providers that will administer a COVID-19 vaccine to Medicare beneficiaries when it becomes available, to make it as convenient as possible for America’s seniors.

CMS and the American Medical Association (AMA) are working collaboratively on finalizing a new approach to report use of COVID-19 vaccines, which include separate vaccine-specific codes. These rates will be geographically adjusted and recognize the costs involved in administering the vaccine, including the additional resources involved with required public health reporting, conducting important outreach and patient education, and spending additional time with patients answering any questions they may have about the vaccine.

CMS is encouraging state policymakers and other private insurance agencies to utilize the information on the Medicare reimbursement strategy to develop their vaccine administration payment plan in the Medicaid program, CHIP, the Basic Health Program (BHP), and private plans. Using the Medicare strategy as a model would allow states to match federal efforts in successfully administering the full vaccine to the most vulnerable populations.

Test data submitted to NHS will be reported to appropriate state and local health departments using standard electronic laboratory messages. In order to utilize the new pathway to fulfill reporting requirements, nursing homes and other long-term care facilities that are NHS users will need to upgrade their NHS Secure Access Management Service (Same) from Level 1 to Level 3.

device management advanced
(Source: theboringlab.com)

Tracking this information allows facilities to identify problems, improve care, and determine progress toward national healthcare-associated infection goals. Note: CSV file submission is not currently available for the Point-of-Care (POC) Test Reporting Tool.

CMS is also providing additional support to state Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) agencies in their efforts to expand access to telehealth. Medicare will begin paying eligible practitioners who furnish these newly added telehealth services effective immediately, and for the duration of the PHE.

The updated supplemental information is intended to help states strategically think through how they explain and clarify to providers and other stakeholders which policies are temporary or permanent. The toolkit includes approaches and tools states can use to communicate with providers on utilizing telehealth for patient care.

It updates and consolidates in one place the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) and resources for states to consider as they begin planning beyond the temporary flexibility provided in response to the pandemic. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHQ) is partnering with the University of New Mexico’s ECHO Institute in Albuquerque and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (Hi) in Boston to establish a National Nursing Home COVID-19 Action Network.

The network will provide free training and mentorship to nursing homes across the country to increase the implementation of evidence-based infection prevention and safety practices to protect residents and staff. Nursing home residents are especially vulnerable to SARS-COV-2 (COVID-19) due to their age, their underlying frailty, and their communal living conditions.

(Source: www.youtube.com)

It is estimated that almost 56,000 nursing home residents and staff have died from COVID-19, representing more than one-quarter of the nation’s known COVID-19 deaths. “Protecting vulnerable older Americans in nursing homes is a central part of our fight against COVID-19, and we’ve learned that improving infection control in many nursing homes is not a matter of will but of skill,” said HHS Secretary Alex Agar.

“AHQ is deploying its unique expertise in partnership with Project ECHO and Hi to help nursing homes protect both their residents and staff from the virus, slowing the spread and saving lives.” “Expanding the use of proven safety practices will directly benefit nursing home residents and staff members and help save lives,” said AHQ Director Goal Hanna, M.B.A. “AHQ has a proven track record of producing science and research to address critical needs such as responding to COVID-19 and achieving 21st century care for all Americans.

The new network is being created under an AHQ contract worth up to $237 million that is part of the nearly $5 billion Provider Relief Fund authorized earlier this year under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. Nursing homes that actively participate are eligible to receive $6,000 in compensation to cover staff training time.

While the curriculum will continue to be refined as new evidence emerges and the pandemic evolves, topics to be covered in the early weeks include: Weekly virtual training sessions will be facilitated by small multidisciplinary teams of subject and quality improvement experts.

Sessions will combine short lectures that provide immediately usable best practices with case-based group learning. Between sessions, a robust community of practice will foster peer-to-peer learning supported by additional expert consultation.

programmed micro control
(Source: www.slideshare.net)

Sanjeev Aurora, M.D., Project ECHO’s director and founder, said he looks forward to leading the initiative in partnership with AHQ. “At a time when the dissemination of best practices in health care is more critical than ever, we are honored to help address this urgent need for nursing homes,” he said.

Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) was established to provide training and telementoring for health care professionals and staff across the nation and around the world. “The ECHO model is a proven approach that brings experts and providers together to learn and solve clinical and operational challenges,” said Mark Parkinson, President and CEO for the American Health Care Association/National Center for Assisted Living.

“We strongly encourage providers to participate in the COVID-19 Action Network to get access to experts and learn the latest best practices preventing the spread of COVID-19.” Use this calculator to find a Hips code and estimated payment based on the SNF(Skilled Nursing Facility) PDP (Patient-Driven Payment Model).

Not attempted due to environmental limitations (e.g., lack of equipment, weather constraints)88. Not attempted due to medical condition or safety concerns B.

Not attempted due to environmental limitations (e.g., lack of equipment, weather constraints)88. Not attempted due to medical condition or safety concerns C. Toileting hygiene: The ability to maintain perineal hygiene, adjust clothes before and after voiding or having a bowel movement.

(Source: www.epr-online.de)

Helper lifts, holds, or supports trunk or limbs, but provides less than half the effort02. Helper lifts or holds trunk or limbs and provides more than half the effort01.

Helper lifts, holds, or supports trunk or limbs, but provides less than half the effort02. Helper lifts or holds trunk or limbs and provides more than half the effort01.

Not attempted due to environmental limitations (e.g., lack of equipment, weather constraints)88. Not attempted due to medical condition or safety concerns D. Sit to stand: The ability to come to a standing position from sitting in a chair, wheelchair, or on the side of the bed.

Helper lifts, holds, or supports trunk or limbs, but provides less than half the effort02. Helper lifts or holds trunk or limbs and provides more than half the effort01.

Helper lifts, holds, or supports trunk or limbs, but provides less than half the effort02. Helper lifts or holds trunk or limbs and provides more than half the effort01.

technology nodesign ircam collective connected explores sequencer technologies through sokehaliyikama technolog
(Source: www.pinterest.com)

Helper lifts, holds, or supports trunk or limbs, but provides less than half the effort02. Helper lifts or holds trunk or limbs and provides more than half the effort01.

Not attempted due to environmental limitations (e.g., lack of equipment, weather constraints)88. Not attempted due to medical condition or safety concerns J.

Helper lifts, holds, or supports trunk or limbs, but provides less than half the effort02. Helper lifts or holds trunk or limbs and provides more than half the effort01.

Not attempted due to environmental limitations (e.g., lack of equipment, weather constraints)88. Not attempted due to medical condition or safety concerns Interim Performance GG0130.

Not attempted due to environmental limitations (e.g., lack of equipment, weather constraints)88. Not attempted due to medical condition or safety concerns B.

(Source: www.first.org)

Not attempted due to environmental limitations (e.g., lack of equipment, weather constraints)88. Not attempted due to medical condition or safety concerns C. Toileting hygiene: The ability to maintain perineal hygiene, adjust clothes before and after voiding or having a bowel movement.

Helper lifts, holds, or supports trunk or limbs, but provides less than half the effort02. Helper lifts or holds trunk or limbs and provides more than half the effort01.

Helper lifts, holds, or supports trunk or limbs, but provides less than half the effort02. Helper lifts or holds trunk or limbs and provides more than half the effort01.

Not attempted due to environmental limitations (e.g., lack of equipment, weather constraints)88. Not attempted due to medical condition or safety concerns D. Sit to stand: The ability to come to a standing position from sitting in a chair, wheelchair, or on the side of the bed.

Helper lifts, holds, or supports trunk or limbs, but provides less than half the effort02. Helper lifts or holds trunk or limbs and provides more than half the effort01.

cert send questions email
(Source: knoworldwide.com)

Helper lifts, holds, or supports trunk or limbs, but provides less than half the effort02. Helper lifts or holds trunk or limbs and provides more than half the effort01.

Helper lifts, holds, or supports trunk or limbs, but provides less than half the effort02. Helper lifts or holds trunk or limbs and provides more than half the effort01.

Not attempted due to environmental limitations (e.g., lack of equipment, weather constraints)88. Not attempted due to medical condition or safety concerns J.

Not attempted due to environmental limitations (e.g., lack of equipment, weather constraints)88. Not attempted due to medical condition or safety concerns K. Walk 150 feet: Once standing, the ability to walk at least 150 feet in a corridor or similar space.

Other Articles You Might Be Interested In

01: For Florida Fishing Dogs
02: For Florida Fishing Eso
03: For Florida Fishing Forecast
04: For Florida Fishing Gone
05: For Florida Fishing Jacksonville
06: For Florida Fishing Night
07: For Florida Fishing Osrs
08: For Florida Fishing Questions
09: For Florida Fishing Rdr2
10: For Florida Fishing Terraria
Sources
1 terraria.gamepedia.com - https://terraria.gamepedia.com/Fishing
2 terraria.fandom.com - https://terraria.fandom.com/wiki/Fishing
3 terraria.gamepedia.com - https://terraria.gamepedia.com/Fishing_foods
4 terraria.gamepedia.com - https://terraria.gamepedia.com/Fishing_poles
5 terraria.fandom.com - https://terraria.fandom.com/wiki/Bonefish
6 terraria.gamepedia.com - https://terraria.gamepedia.com/Ocean
7 myfwc.com - https://myfwc.com/license/