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Grouper Eats Shark Eating Swordfish

author
James Smith
• Saturday, 28 November, 2020
• 8 min read

That famous idiom might be an apt metaphor for the difficulties of life on the land, but under the sea it’s literally how things work. Rarely does that popular expression look as cool as it does in this incredible footage (that we first saw at Cleaners) captured by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 80 miles off the coast of South Carolina.

grouper shark eats swordfish
(Source: www.planetseafishing.com)

Contents

Deep below the waves, they filmed a shark feeding frenzy, but it got even crazier when another predator truly proved the old adage that “the big fish eat the little ones.” During an exploration by from the NOAA ship Oceans Explore r, the remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer (D2) found a group of around 11 sharks eating the carcass of a recently deceased, eight-foot, nearly 250-pound (or at least it used to be) swordfish, at about 450 meters (1,476 feet) deep.

© Provided by BGR fish eats shark A recent NOAA expedition that explored a portion of the ocean floor got a two-for-one deal on awesome sights. First, the team controlling the remote underwater camera captured footage of a shark feeding frenzy on a dead swordfish, but then a massive grouper showed up.

Shortly after, the grouper managed to devour one of the feeding sharks, grabbing the entire animal in its mouth as it flailed helplessly in the jaws of the huge fish. While that probably isn’t technically true, it is absolutely a fact that some of the deepest reaches of our planet’s oceans hold secrets that we’re only beginning to unlock.

Then, as their time on the bottom began to wane, the team spotted some serious action in the form of a huge dead swordfish that had attracted a whole crew of small sharks. The sharks continued to feast even with the bright lights of the undersea explorer upon them, and they were clearly enjoying the meal that had drifted from higher waters and settled on the ocean floor.

Then, seemingly out of nowhere, the large fish decided he wanted to grab a quick meal of his own, and what better choice than one of the very same sharks that was chomping away at the dead swordfish. The scene played out before the cameras on a remotely operated vehicle called the Deep Discoverer (D2), a piece of equipment on the NOAA ship Oceans Explorer.

grouper shark frenzy swordfish feeding swallows theinertia whole interrupted incredible deep pound mystic aquarium
(Source: www.pinterest.com)

It was the seventh dive on the Windows to the Deep expedition, and it left the viewers aboard nearly speechless. “You can’t plan on seeing these kinds of things, especially in the deep ocean,” wrote Peter J. Austere of Mystic Aquarium and University of Connecticut in the mission log.

“It is simply serendipity; by just spending enough time underwater and being prepared for the unexpected, you can stumble across scenes that will replay in your mind’s eye over and over for a lifetime.” Soon, in the dim reaches of the vehicle’s lights, the operators noticed what appeared to be a feeding frenzy.

A swordfish, measuring around eight feet in length and likely weighing up to 250 pounds, was the main attraction, and at least 11 sharks were gorging on it. “The cause of the death of this majestic animal is unclear, perhaps owing to age, disease, or some other injury,” they wrote.

“Using the ROV for cover, it demonstrated the ability of large predatory fishes to feed on smaller sharks,” the researchers explained. The incredible image was taken at a depth of almost 1,500 feet about 80 miles off the coast of South Carolina by a remotely operated vehicle called the Deep Discoverer, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

It turns out it wasn’t the shipwreck, but scientists didn’t want the trip to be wasted, so they switched the focus to exploring the abundance of sponges, coral, and rocky outcrops on that part of the ocean bottom. User Upload Caption: NOAA's remotely operated vehicle Deep Discovery captured this image of sharks feeding on a billfish at a depth of over 1,400 feet during a June 28, 2019, dive about 80 miles off the coast of South Carolina.

grouper swordfish eating swallowing dead sharks shark sighting rare while vs
(Source: sputniknews.com)

“The most exciting part of the dive came during the last 45 minutes, when the Ross came upon what many of our science team have called a once in a lifetime event,” explains a report on NOAA’s Ocean Exploration and Research website. Due to their preference for the depths of the oceans, recorded events are scarce but fisherman from Florida captured one snatching their catch, a black tip shark, off the line in one bite in 2014.

The most recent event saw eleven sharks picking clean the carcass of a large swordfish weighing around 250lbs (113 kg) when the grouper arrived. It proceeded to engulf one of the small sharks, known as a dogfish, and the entire ruckus was observed by researchers from the NOAA and captured on camera.

A savage grouper fish has been caught on camera devouring a shark on the sea floor by researchers trying to find shipwrecks. The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) posted the video and an account of the shocking events on its blog, which read: 'The swordfish was clearly recently deceased, perhaps only by a few hours, given the condition of its body and the rapid disappearance of its flesh into the stomachs of the sharks.

The onlooking scientists claim the hungry fish used the NOAA's exploratory rover for cover in order to snare its meal. Normally the research team sees little signs of sharks but the presence of the 250lb swordfish brought out a host of animals looking to scavenge its remains.

First, the team controlling the remote underwater camera captured footage of a shark feeding frenzy on a dead swordfish, but then a massive grouper showed up. Shortly after, the grouper managed to devour one of the feeding sharks, grabbing the entire animal in its mouth as it flailed helplessly in the jaws of the huge fish.

grouper shark whole borninspace eats
(Source: www.borninspace.com)

While that probably isn’t technically true, it is absolutely a fact that some of the deepest reaches of our planet’s oceans hold secrets that we’re only beginning to unlock. Then, as their time on the bottom began to wane, the team spotted some serious action in the form of a huge dead swordfish that had attracted a whole crew of small sharks.

The sharks continued to feast even with the bright lights of the undersea explorer upon them, and they were clearly enjoying the meal that had drifted from higher waters and settled on the ocean floor. Mike Werner has reported on technology and video games for the past decade, covering breaking news and trends in VR, wearables, smartphones, and future tech.

Most recently, Mike served as Tech Editor at The Daily Dot, and has been featured in Mid American Herald, Time.com, and countless other web and print outlets. A group of sharks feasting on a deceased marlin were reduced by one when a bigger fish swam by and gulped one of them down whole.

The drama unfolded off the coast of South Carolina last month as a dive bot, the remote-operated vehicle Deep Discoverer (D2), surveyed the sea bottom for evidence of a World War II shipwreck, NOAA said in a blog post. First the camera caught the routine, expected, rocks, corals, sponges and “a diversity of other invertebrates and small shelter-seeking fishes,” NOAA said.

“Using the ROV for cover, it demonstrated the ability of large predatory fishes to feed on smaller sharks,” NOAA said. An incredible video has emerged that shows a gigantic fish scoffing down a shark whole.

shark fish eating deep sea wreckfish noaa okeanos rare grouper feeding ocean windows explorer bite exploration sharks eat eats dive
(Source: oceanexplorer.noaa.gov)

There were 11 sharks, two types of dogfish if we're being precise, feasting on the huge carcass of a dead swordfish. Credit: Loathe NOAA shared the video along with the story of what they'd seen in a blog post that read: “The swordfish was clearly recently deceased, perhaps only by a few hours, given the condition of its body and the rapid disappearance of its flesh into the stomachs of the sharks.

The post continued: “It demonstrated the ability of large predatory fishes to feed on smaller sharks. “As relatively small apex predators, they spend a great deal of time searching for prey.

I grew up with a massive shark poster on my wall where I memorized the names and dreamed about swimming with them without a cage. I think it’s cruel, wasteful, and should be banned, and those who are caught face stiff life-changing punishments.

Eating and/or sharing the bounty with friends and family is a good start. Putting the non-consumable bits in a garden or way for the nutrients to go back into the system is even better.

After a few hours, we hooked up on one using a small wire leader and a chunk of bonito. This was exciting because earlier we had another hookup only to have the soup fin’s tail break off our line.

swordfish eating shark grouper
(Source: www.pinterest.com)

That’s why it’s essential to look at the signs of the fish, whether it’s over-stressed, bleeding, or hurt to know when it’s better to take it home than release it (where lawful). This is a primary reason people don’t like eating shark meat because when ill-prepared, it leads to an ammonia odor that no one would enjoy.

To make it easier, we hoisted the tail of the shark with a rope and let it hang. We then took a fillet knife and cut down the belly of the shark and let the guts fall into a bucket.

You can let it hang for longer as it should help with improving the quality of meat, but we were doing this late at night and were tired. We got our fillet knife nice and sharp and cut the main body into 2 inch thick steaks.

When we got closer to the tail, we performed a standard fillet method of cutting. Storing Shark Meat We placed the steaks and fillets into vacuum-sealed bags to save.

Using a vacuum sealer removes the air from around the shark meat, which reduces the chance of spoiling. Therefore, it’s essential to watch your consumption of it to reduce your susceptibility of mercury poisoning.

shark grouper eats alive
(Source: www.youtube.com)

High Levels of mercury can lead to different neurodiverse, so it’s essential to read up on the published scientific literature out there and follow health guidelines. I personally choose to eat sharks maybe a few times a year, depending on the situation.

I’ve personally eaten a soup fin shark and found it surprising. A: Soup fin shark has the texture of steak and a light flavor.

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Sources
1 fishingbooker.com - https://fishingbooker.com/blog/florida-fishing-spots/
2 www.bocacoast.com - https://www.bocacoast.com/
3 www.saltstrong.com - https://www.saltstrong.com/articles/florida-winter-fishing-tips/
4 fishinglidokey.com - https://fishinglidokey.com/guide-inshore-saltwater-fishing/