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Can Groupers Eat Humans

author
Earl Hamilton
• Sunday, 11 October, 2020
• 10 min read

While diving in 80-foot deep waters off the coast of Jupiter, Florida, spear fisherman Arif Saber had a standoff with a seemingly fearless and ferocious Goliath grouper, which Grind TV estimated was 300- to 400-pounds. Saber had just caught a lesser amber jack with his spearfish gun, he told Grind TV, when he noticed the large grouper eyeing him and closing the distance in between them.

grouper eat human crustaceans
(Source: www.slideshare.net)

Contents

The video, shot by his wife using a GoPro 3, shows the hefty fish as he nips at the man's flipper, tearing it off, and then goes straight for his catch with its powerful jaw. But, even if the diver wasn't familiar with that specific size of this type of fish, Goliath groupers have been known to roam western Atlantic waters near Florida.

If you are referring to the fish known as grouper, a true vegetarian would say “No” and would not eat it. Fish is considered flesh or meat by vegetarians and therefore off limits.

If u live in Florida best place to catch grouper with pilchard is at the Jensen beach causeway Reef groupers are eaten by larger fish like sharks, eels, and rays.

Giant grouper can grow to 8 feet, and they are eaten by sharks. The Goliath Grouper (formerly known as the Jewish) all-tackle world record was set back in 1961, in Fernanda Beach, FL…that fish was a colossal 680 POUNDS.

So now that we’ve established their impressive size, it’s easy to question why in the hell a spear fishermen would get so close to one out in open water. If that dinosaur didn’t come along and try to swallow that guy whole maybe a bull shark would have swum by for a tasty (bloody) treat.

shark grouper goliath fish swallowed swallows bite
(Source: www.unknownlist.com)

Photograph by Raul Toulon, National Geographic Creative The Atlantic Goliath grouper (Epimetheus Tamara) isn’t the meanest or fastest fish on the reef. Though the Atlantic Goliath grouper can grow up to 800 pounds (363 kilograms) and eight feet (2.4 meters) in length, it subsists almost entirely on smallish mud crabs.

“From all available data, Goliath grouper do not eat sharks,” said Dr. Matthew Craig, a National Geographic grantee and marine biologist at the University of San Diego in California. Christopher Koenig, a biologist from Florida State University, confirms that groupers preying on sharks is unlikely under normal conditions.

While some fishermen say Goliath groupers have bounced back since then and should be taken off the Endangered Species List, most conservationists agree that the slow-growing giants are still recovering. Watch video of Goliath groupers up close with photographer David Doublet, who shot the images for a story on this fish in the July issue of National Geographic magazine.

Groupers are not predatory in nature, so I doubt you would have to fear an attack... They do not have many teeth on the edges of their jaws, but they have heavy crushing tooth plates inside the pharynx.

Reports of fatal attacks on humans by the largest species, the giant grouper (Epimetheus lanceolatus) are unconfirmed. They also use their mouths to dig into sand to form their shelters under big rocks, jetting it out through their gills.

goliath groupers attacking baits hungry blacktiph
(Source: www.youtube.com)

These birds can be found on almost every continent, but their uniqueness makes them a special experience for everyone lucky enough to see them in the wild. Because of these traits and their uniqueness, they are considered a rare and unusual appearance.

On the other hand, pigeons are widely spread birds, as well, but they are a way more common sight than seeing flamingos. The reason is the fact they share their habitat with humans, unlike the flamingos which live in the wild.

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It is the largest, most familiar, most internationally represented and most powerful intergovernmental organization in the world. The UN is headquartered on international territory in New York City; other main offices are in Geneva, Nairobi, Vienna and The Hague.

Goliath groupers must be immediately returned to the ocean if caught on the fishing line as it is under protected category in Florida since 1990 due to its declining population, and possessing them is strictly prohibited in the state. Goliath groupers that are typically identified by dark striped bodies and large mouths can grow up to 8 feet long and weigh about 800 pounds.

grouper liver eat king ieatishootipost throat
(Source: ieatishootipost.sg)

In a similar incident in 2014, a giant grouper snatched up a blacktop shark in just one bite and dragged it into the ocean in Bonita Springs, Florida. Daryl Martin, a spokesperson at the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, told ABC News that groupers are opportunity feeders and eat large preys.

As populations grow, wealthier countries are able to purchase fishery products from around the world, making less available to those who cannot afford it. These types of toxins can reach lethal doses or cause other temporary or permanent damage, when sufficiently concentrated.

Global warming could lead to these toxins becoming more widely distributed and may cause changes in where they occur to the extent that local knowledge will not be sufficient to protect against their harvest. Temporary impacts of this nature are often found around the world when large storms strike the coast.

In some cases, the marine seafood species are also susceptible to unfamiliar pathogens and to heavy metals. Warmer temperatures enhance the ability for new strains of Cholera to move to and colonize new areas.

Cooking can destroy cholera, but many people prefer to eat clams and oysters raw, thus increasing their susceptibility to the disease. As stocks are redistributed with climate change, local fishers will likely pursue them from their usual port for some time.

grouper giant fish shark eats goliath eat meal atlantic fishing slurps typical down saying geographic national august puerto
(Source: blog.nationalgeographic.org)

This may lead to both unhealthy seafood in the market and to consumer resistance, once a bad meal is encountered. Hi guys, As some of you know I really enjoy spearfishing and fish a lot, however I have changed my mind regarding the grouper.

I am a full time scuba Instructor since a while now and have made quiet some “grouper friends” and lost some due to my spearfishing colleagues. At the moment I am working on the Canary Islands, and there is one grouper that you can actually call by his name underwater and you will see him coming out of the blue somewhere, you can pet him, stroke him or even kiss him.

I almost got into a fist fight:martial, cause some idiot wanted to go and spear him, what a loser!!! Last year I lost another friend, a 18 kg grouper, and I am sure now, because I saw him in the restaurant next door to the dive center.

I have lost a lot of respect for some famous Spanish spearfishes in Ibiza, they go around scuba centers and ask.....payoff.... Losers!! I understand where you're coming from, but i don't see this as the type of argument that will have an unanimous vote... We had a similar situation with a wrasse, (which many people fish all over the world), but we had one called George, like your Bob...and one day he was caught spearfishing.people said “death to the spare”...but in retrospect, he was a foreigner, didn't know about George and that he was a resident wrasse/napoleon fish...so in his perspective he didn't realize it was such a bad thing to do... On another note, what about groupers in other parts of the world, that don't come and greet you...that sprint away as soon as they see a diver... you see what I mean, you can't make these generalizations... I find the right solution for each of these species (not just grouper) is that the local regulations be clear in regard to which fish can be caught, at what time of year, minimum length, maximum quantity etc... once a spare is abiding by all these regulations, it is up to him if he wants to shoot something easy or not, we shouldn't judge...but ok its generally more “sporty”if there is some challenge in it.... Ive seen videos of Spanish Spears, make repetitive free dives to 35+ meters to catch big grouper...you can't call that spare a loser...I'm sorry...

As long as I am observing legal take limits and otherwise acting within the law, I don't see why grouper deserve to be treated differently from other fish. And as far as sport goes- last summer I attended a spearfishing Expo in Florida, and a Greek diver showed video of free diving to 140 feet, shooting grouper back in holes, and then pulling them out before starting for the surface.

grouper goliath friendly deb menu fish scubaverse
(Source: animalbreeze.com)

I spearfish to obtain food and equally to satisfy the primeval urge to hunt. Many of the fish I hunt require skill to catch but I don't regard any species as more or less “sporting” than any other, just different.

However, I think giving wild fish names and altering their natural behavior by feeding and interacting with them is a circus trick and unless done in a marine park is bound to end in disaster. Incidentally I am not totally against something like this in the way that I see the benefit in zoos as a means to educate those humans not fortunate enough to see the natural world in its wild state.

In conclusion (sorry I've rambled on) I see where Mike is coming from and I wish him success in introducing people to fish for their enjoyment but where this involves taming fish that are legal to hunt then it is always going to end in tears. Greendiver, sorry to hear about the loss of your fish friends, i to have watched these videos on YouTube of people spearing big groupers and have not been impressed, some have too made me quite angry, some of these poor things have been so tame that they just sit there with a spare pointing a speargun right in its face then shooting it.

My point was that it isn't necessarily “unfair” or “taking advantage” to shoot a grouper when it has not been domesticated. I see where you are coming from bill McIntyre, I am no expert on grouper by any means, I know what you mean, I suppose if the grouper is not being hunted over grounds where the scuba divers regularly visit then I can see the grouper being less friendly, and therefore harder to shot.i don't know about the ones in the YouTube videos as they look quite tame, does anybody have an opinion on them, do you think they are slightly tame or not.

Sorry for using the word “tame” so many times in one sentence, could not think of any other way to put it. I mentioned in another thread today of a huge Mullet that has been coming to say hello to the locals this year and that none of us have shot it.

goliath grouper scared humans should nice
(Source: animalbreeze.com)

Perhaps if the scuba divers told the “famous” spearfishes that five huge grouper scan be found in some barren piece of sea the chances of Bob's survival would increase, or even better left Bob to being a wild fish all together. I think of my farming friends who give their animals good living conditions up until they wack em.

Sport serves to limit laziness and balances our advantage reaped by the use of a pointy stick. The contest between human and animal can never be truly fair because we adapt and exploit as fast or maybe even faster than a virus.

Pardon me, I've got to go take the neighbor's fat dog out of the oven before it burns and stinks up the kitchen. Don't make friends with someone's dinner, unless you want to be upset. Maybe his name is really Dodo, it would sound the same underwater.

Hi Bill, yep I agree, and know what you mean, I will definitely think about making new “friends” again...however, this guy has been here for years!! I was diving in a place that was not a reserve and a diver on the beach told me not to shoot his pet ling cod that lived in the cove.

There are plenty of fish in the sea and I think the smaller ones sometimes taste better than ancient ones. Well that poor guy got his heart broken because someone went and shot his pet long soon after.

grouper shark eats bite huge evonews mouths gills form sucking powerful system
(Source: evonews.com)

I think if people want to make friends with fish they should do it in a reserve. However, I think giving wild fish names and altering their natural behavior by feeding and interacting with them is a circus trick and unless done in a marine park is bound to end in disaster.

Incidentally I am not totally against something like this in the way that I see the benefit in zoos as a means to educate those humans not fortunate enough to see the natural world in its wild state. In conclusion (sorry I've rambled on) I see where Mike is coming from and I wish him success in introducing people to fish for their enjoyment but where this involves taming fish that are legal to hunt then it is always going to end in tears.

I understand where you're coming from, but i don't see this as the type of argument that will have an unanimous vote... We had a similar situation with a wrasse, (which many people fish all over the world), but we had one called George, like your Bob...and one day he was caught spearfishing.people said “death to the spare”...but in retrospect, he was a foreigner, didn't know about George and that he was a resident wrasse/napoleon fish...so in his perspective he didn't realize it was such a bad thing to do... On another note, what about groupers in other parts of the world, that don't come and greet you...that sprint away as soon as they see a diver... you see what I mean, you can't make these generalizations... I find the right solution for each of these species (not just grouper) is that the local regulations be clear in regard to which fish can be caught, at what time of year, minimum length, maximum quantity etc... once a spare is abiding by all these regulations, it is up to him if he wants to shoot something easy or not, we shouldn't judge...but ok its generally more “sporty”if there is some challenge in it.... Ive seen videos of Spanish Spears, make repetitive free dives to 35+ meters to catch big grouper...you can't call that spare a loser...I'm sorry... You miss the point, I know it is difficult to catch a big grouper, I live in Spain and fish a lot, I have also lost a couple of spears and even a gun trying, so I understand... I am talking about groupers like “Bob”......

As my name says Grouper are my favorite prey, but as I do live in a very small place I also know all the scuba boys and their friendly feeds, so its just pure ethics, don't kill what others make a living from because they might hurt you:martial. When I first started free diving it was the first one I had ever seen, as they live in caves (territorial) they are easier to go back to.

The grouper would let me enter the cave, getting within arms reach before bolting out the back door. I believe that, unfortunately, hunting has changed my underwater body language, and although he can 't see the gun, senses danger.

ocean grouper giant proof omg terrifying footage place awful source desktop earthporm
(Source: earthporm.com)

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